How to visualize the waveforms in real time

Note

The programs listed here (except for the first) are installed on your desktop/laptop computer/raspberry pi and not on the Raspberry Shake itself. They are third-party programs that were not developed by the Raspberry Shake team. We have made modifications to them or to the Shake itself to ensure compatibility.

Warning

Since many of the programs below work in real time, it is important that your local desktop computer or laptop where the programs are executing has correct time. Most computer can easily sync their system times to “Network Timing Protocol” or NTP servers.

Note

There are a lot of programs available that you can install locally on your desktop or laptop computer for data visualization and interrogation. These programs generally connect remotely to your Raspberry Shake via a special communication protocol called SeedLink. In the case of Swarm, you can also easily connect to the Raspberry Shake Community server to see waveforms from all of the other Raspberry Shakes in the world- and there are HUNDREDS of them!

Helicorder web plot

http://rs.local/heli

The helicorder plot is a web-based application native to your Raspberry Shake that displays 12 hours of data at a time in the format shown in the image below:

_images/R52CB_SHZ_AM_00.2017041400.gif

After turning on the Shake, the helicorder plotting program will take ~15 minutes to plot the first trace. The helicorder plotting program is configured to update every 2 minutes. GIF images are saved to:

/opt/data/gifs

The helicorder is not updated in real-time. For real-time data use SWARM or seisgram2k.

You can adjust the helicorder’s scale by visiting the Raspberry Shake’s webpage at http://rs.local/ >> Settings icon >> DATA >> Helicorder Scaling Value.

rsudp

rsudp was originally developed by Raspberry Shake as a way to visualize live data, but it has morphed into something much more complex than that.

rsudp is a program designed to receive a datacast (see Raspberry Shake Data Producer UDP Port Output) from a Raspberry Shake or Raspberry Boom and use it to track sudden motion events, send out social media alerts, play alert sounds, and more.

_images/4d-event.png

rsudp is open source and written in python, but can be run by coding novices and non-coders alike. Please read the documentation first, then ask relevant questions on our forum for help.

Documentation

rsudp documentation can be found here.

Download

The source code can be found here, but we recommend following the installation guide for installation instructions. The software needs a Python and some packages (such as numpy, for example) to work properly.

Tutorial

The full tutorial is here, while the video tutorial can be found in two parts here and here

Swarm

Swarm is an extraordinary and useful tool created and mantained by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that will allow you to enjoy, explore, discover and understand earthquakes in a simple way. Swarm allows you to visualize the seismic data from your Raspberry Shake from your desktop or laptop computer. Swarm was developed by the USGS Volcano Hazards Program and is easily the most widely used seismological application. It runs from your desktop or laptop computer on Linux, MAC and Windows and remotely accesses the data from your Raspberry Shake.

_images/R3F35-hawaii.png

July, 2018 Volcanic activity at Hawai’i - hundreds of earthquakes per day!

Documentation

For our step-by-step and operating system-specific installation instructions see: Swarm Installation Guide.

For the software official USGS guide, please go here.

Download

You can download the preconfigured Swarm application from http://rs.local >> Actions icon >> DOWNLOADS >> SWARM.

Note

For those running Swarm on Linux, including Raspberry Pi: Swarm will only work with the Oracle versions of Java. You will get strange bugs and errors if you try to run it with any of the OpenJDK versions.

(if you don’t know what this means, you’re probably on Windows or Mac and you’ll probably not run into this problem)

If the preconfigured application is not working properly, you can download it from the USGS website here and then proceed through the Raspberry Shake-specific configuration section below.

Tutorials

Click here for the USGS’s tutorial on how to use Swarm.

For our tutorial, you can watch the video below:

Raspberry Shake-specific configuration

If you are configuring Swarm on your own, we recommend not using the SeedLink Server Data Source. The SeedLink Server implementation in Swarm only has access to the data currently in the SeedLink buffer. Use the Winston Wave Server Data Source to connect to the OSOP Wave Server instead (Read more about OWS here). The OWS is highly optimized and has the added benefit that it serves what is inside of the SeedLink Server buffer PLUS any data on disk (Raspberry Shake saves the last 7 days of data to disk for this reason).

Data Source Name: myShake
     Data Source: Winston Wave Server (this is a proxy for the OSOP Wave Server)
              IP: rs.local OR the actual IP
            Port: 16032
         Timeout: 15 seconds
 Use Compression: Yes

Note

The default Winston Wave Server port is 16022. Raspberry Shake’s OSOP Wave Server connection operates on 16032.

Click here to learn more about the OSOP Wave Server (OWS).

Historical data

And you can add a second data source to see historical data from your Raspberry Shake and any other Raspberry Shake in the AM network:

Data Source Name: RS Community CAPS
     Data Source: Winston Wave Server (this is a proxy for the Common Acquisition Protocol Server)
              IP: caps.raspberryshakedata.com
            Port: 16022
         Timeout: 15 seconds
 Use Compression: Yes

Data from this data source is not provided in real-time. It is delayed by 30 minutes. You will notice the data updates in the helicorder display but remains at t minus 30 minutes. For real-time data, use the myShake data source referenced above. Click here to learn more about the Common Acquisition Protocol Server (CAPS).

jAmaSeis

jAmaSeis, a program for visualizing waveform data, and determining earthquake locations/ magnitudes, was developed by IRIS for the Seismographs in Schools program. Raspberry Shake funded the changes need to make jAmaSeis Raspberry Shake and SeedLink-compatible in early 2017.

jAmaSeis, which is installed on your desktop or laptop runs on all platforms (Linux, MAC, Windows) and connects remotely to your Raspberry Shake to acquire the waveform data.

_images/Travel_Time_Computation.jpg

Download

jAmaSeis can be downloaded from the IRIS website at jAmaSeis.

Tutorials

Click here for the official jAmaSeis Manual and operating system-specific installation instructions.

For our step-by-step and operating system-specific installation instructions see: jAmaSeis Installation Guide.

Raspberry Shake-specific configuration

To get jAmaSeis up and running with your Raspberry Shake:

  1. Choose File >> Add Source. This will open both the “Sources Manager” and “Add Source” windows.

  2. Click on the “Raspberry Shake” button. This will close the “Add Source” window and open the “Raspberry Shake source” window.

  3. Enter rs.local:18000 or your Raspberry Shake’s actual IP address with port 18000 (for example 192.168.1.110:18000). Notice that whereas Swarm runs on port 16032, jAmaSeis runs on port 18000.

    Warning

    The IP:Port default of raspberryshake.local:18000 is wrong and must be changed.

    Note

    jAmaSeis connects to the Raspberry Shake’s SeedLink server on port 18000 which is a real-time data server. The server has a buffer with some hours of data. But when that data is written to disk and cleared from the server’s memory buffer, it is no longer accessible by jAmaSeis. This is a big difference as compared to Swarm, for example, which connects to the OSOP Wave Server which has access to both real-time and archived data. So, if you are trying to use jAmaSeis to look at data a few days old and nothing is plotting up, this is the reason.

  4. Click on the “Get Stations” button that appear beneath the IP field. This will interrogate the Raspberry Shake’s local SeedLink server and autopopulate the field for you.

  5. Hit the “OK” button which will close the “Raspberry Shake source” window and bring you back to the “Source Manager” Window. You should see your Raspberry Shake listed as a source.

  6. Click on “OK” at the “Sources Manager” screen. The helicorder plot of your Raspberry Shake should now appear in the main window. Give it a minute or two to populate the data.

    IP: rs.local OR the actual IP

    Port: 16032

    Timeout: 15 seconds

    Use Compression: Yes

Note

The default Winston Wave Server port is 16022. Raspberry Shake’s OSOP Wave Server connection operates on 16032.

Click here to learn more about the OSOP Wave Server (OWS).

Historical data

And you can add a second data source to see historical data from your Raspberry Shake and any other Raspberry Shake in the AM network:

Data Source Name: RS Community CAPS
     Data Source: Winston Wave Server (this is a proxy for the Common Acquisition Protocol Server)
              IP: caps.raspberryshakedata.com
            Port: 16022
         Timeout: 15 seconds
 Use Compression: Yes

Data from this data source is not provided in real-time. It is delayed by 30 minutes. You will notice the data updates in the helicorder display but remains at t minus 30 minutes. For real-time data, use the myShake data source referenced above. Click here to learn more about the Common Acquisition Protocol Server (CAPS).

seisgram2k

seisgram2k, developed by Anthony Lomax, is a great program for visualizing earth motions recorded by your Raspberry Shake in real-time:

_images/seisgram2k-rt.jpg

Download

You can download seisgram2k here. We recommend this version: seisgram2k for schools. This version has some neat additions that are designed for school users and amateurs. The nicest feature is an interactive traveltime plotter which lets users slide a seismogram around on a plot of P and S traveltimes to determine the distance to an earthquake as seen below:

_images/seisgram2k-plot.png

The school version of the software also contains simple filter and spectrum/ spectrogram tools.

Tutorials

Click here for a short guide on how to use the software.

For our step-by-step and operating system-specific installation instructions see: seisgram2k Installation Guide.

Example seisgram2k execution for RS1D

$ java -cp SeisGram2K70_SCHOOL.jar net.alomax.seisgram2k.SeisGram2K  -seedlink "rs.local:18000#AM_R5DCF:00SHZ#300"

Replace “R5DCF” with your Raspberry Shake’s station name and “SHZ” with the proper Channel Code (for more information see: Raspberry Shake Naming Convention). Notice that whereas Swarm runs on port 16032, seisgram2k runs on port 18000.

Example seisgram2k execution for RS3D

$ java -cp SeisGram2K70_SCHOOL.jar net.alomax.seisgram2k.SeisGram2K  -seedlink "rs.local:18000#AM_R5DCF:00EH?#300"

Replace “R5DCF” with your Raspberry Shake’s station name and “EH?” with the proper Channel Code (for more information see: Raspberry Shake Naming Convention). Notice that whereas Swarm runs on port 16032, seisgram2k runs on port 18000.

Special Windows Note

For Windows users you might consider creating a batch file containing the following:

SeisGram2K70_SCHOOL.jar net.alomax.seisgram2k.SeisGram2K  -seedlink "rs.local:18000#AM_R5DCF:00SHZ#300"

And similarly replacing “R5DCF” with your Raspberry Shake’s station name and “SHZ” with the proper Channel Code (for more information see: Raspberry Shake Naming Convention). Then save the file to the Seisgram2k directory as “Seisgram2k.bat”. Then you can click to open the batch file and this will load Seisgram2k and connect to your Raspberry Shake.

Other methods

IRIS

It is not possible to get Shake data from IRIS, since IRIS does not host any of our data. However, you can get Shake data into your local SEISCOMP3 by connecting it to your Shake local SeedLink.

FDSN Federator System

It is also possible to obtain your Shake data in an easy way, since we are integrated into the FDSN Federator System: FDSN: AM: Raspberry Shake (notice FSDN Web Services are used to access station metadata in our network, coded AM), and this page of our guide has the details on the matter: FDSN Web Services — Instructions on Setting Up Your Raspberry Shake.

On this, remember that FDSNWS supports three request types: event, data and inventory (metadata). We support only the inventory through IRIS and inventory + data (but not in real-time) via our Shake Data Center